Archive for the 'Equality Act 2010' Category

Some are more equal than others

August 2, 2010

Zöe has a must-read post called simply Equality? over at her blog, in which she takes a look at the changes the Equality Act 2010 (direct link to PDF) will bring and concludes that:

It means that there is one “protected” class where protection is explicitly removed, not granted. It means that a gender recognition certificate is not worth the paper it’s printed on. Rather than being a recognition that they are of the target gender, it’s a nullity, as the law states that they’re not, not really. […]

[…] any legally sex-segregated area can now legally exclude anyone who’s trans from either being employed there, or as customers.

Regardless of whether they have a GRC or not.

All the proprietors have to prove is that it’s genuinely possible some of their clientele might be lost should they allow a “transsexual person” to be present on the premises.

Note also that the converse does not apply: it is illegal sex-discrimination to require counsellors for trans people to be trans themselves.

[…]

[The Equality Act 2010] effectively repeals large sections of the Gender Recognition Act 2004 – to wit, in all areas of provision of legally sex-segregated services. Things like toilets for example.

Note that it does not apply to transgendered people who are not transsexual persons. Only those who have started or completed the process of transition. Crossdressers good, transsexuals bad.

So apparently, even though I have a full GRC, and all my other documentation shows my gender correctly, I will no longer legally be a woman when this Act comes into force in October; I’ll be a “transsexual person” and that means I can forget it if I think I can count on UK law for any protection of my civil and human rights.

I’m already seeing a groundswell of outrage and anger amongst some of my trans sisters online; I think it’s entirely understandable, even justifiable. Because, when you get right down to it, cis society is transphobic, by default and to its core; there is precious little respite for trans people and, like most humans, repeatedly backing us into a corner isn’t going to put us in the best of humours.

But anti-trans prejudice is so deeply embedded in cis society that all the legislation in the world is never going to change anything for the better, least of all the attitudes of cis people. There’s no logic, no acceptance and certainly no justice. There never really was – all this legislation will do is formalise a state of affairs which already exists.

Cis people may, rightly, feel aggrieved about the low proportion of reported rapes that end in a successful prosecution – but has anyone ever seen statistics for reported rapes of trans people? Has anyone ever heard of even one trans person who’s seen a successful prosecution? And there may well be too few rape crisis centres available to cis women – but how many of them will even let a trans woman through the door, let alone offer help and support?

The fact is that the law – like many other aspects of society which the majority of cis people take for granted – is simply not accessible to us. Trans people are routinely dehumanised and demonised, excluded and harassed, attacked and even murdered with impunity by cis people from across the entire class spectrum – and, be honest, would you trust a system in which nearly everyone you meet treats you as less than human?

As the old joke goes: it doesn’t matter which way you vote, the government still gets in. And as far as I’m concerned, with this legislation, the government looks set to do a far better job of morally mandating people like me out of existence than Janice Raymond could ever dream of.

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Cross-posted at The F-Word

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Government confirms Equality Act to be implemented as planned

July 3, 2010

Via the UK Press Association:

Minister backs gender equality law

The Government is to go ahead with Labour legislation which could require employers to disclose whether they pay women as much as men, it has been announced.

Home Secretary Theresa May, who is also the Equalities Minister, said that the implementation of the Equality Act, which was passed into law in the last Parliament, would go ahead as planned from next October.

Mrs May said that the new law – which brings together nine separate pieces of legislation into a single act – would reduce the burden on business by making it easier to comply with anti-discrimination rules.

However the CBI expressed disappointment that the new Government had not taken the opportunity to drop provisions requiring firms to conduct a “gender pay audit” if there is evidence of “unfairness”.

Katja Hall, the CBI director of human resources policy, said that the measure was likely to be misleading and could prove counter-productive in addressing the “gender pay gap”.

[…]

Mrs May said said that implementing the act in accord with the planned timetable demonstrated the new coalition Government’s commitment to equality.

She said: “By making the law easier to understand, the Equality Act will help businesses treat staff fairly and meet the needs of a diverse customer base. The law will be easier to understand and better able to protect people from discrimination. A successful economy needs the full participation of all its citizens and we are committed to implementing the Act in the best way for business.”

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Cross-posted at The F-Word

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